Tag Archives: lighting

Funky Pendant Lights!

Clear fused glass with black accents and whimsical kiln carving, “draped” over a mold.

I made this unique pendant light set specifically for display and sale at my PRAXIS Gallery show in Toronto’s Queen St. West arts district (running through to December 31, 2011).

One fixture has a chrome finish; the other, in antique brass. I like the eclectic nature of this effect: both fixtures are nearly identical, but not quite; the same goes for the fused glass shades themselves – both are different, and you must see them up close to tell!

You can merely drive by PRAXIS Gallery at 1614 Queen St. West (in Parkdale at Sorauren), day or night, and see them for yourself. (Click here for map to gallery).

Below is a slideshow of the set. You’ll see one photo shows a reproduction “Edison”-type light bulb used instead of a standard clear bulb – looks even better!

Cube Floor Lamp












Be sure to check out “The Making Of …” this work.


(2008)

Simple in overall shape, this cube-like lamp design is all about the glass – the rich, dramatic textured hand-rolled variations in greens, blood-browns, caramels, and white (note the mottled effect in some of the glass – it’s wonderful).  You’ll see that Greg has utilized this form factor before.

Pre-cut glass of this nature is a work of art in itself – it’s almost a shame to work it into another form!  Which is why you’ll notice larger swaths of colour accentuate naturally-forming ebbs and flows of both.  There are no “random” shapes in these panels: colour and texture choices interweave to create a dramatic presentation, celebrating the glass.

The video clip below the slideshow reveals in motion this flow between each panel – delicious!

Star-Moon Sconce

A striking accent to an entranceway or hallway.

Approximately 12″ wide x 8″ high x 7″ deep.

Cube Floor Lamp (The Making Of)

See the completed work here.

(2008)

This is a striking lamp made from all hand-rolled glass (mostly Uroboros) in the copper-foil method.  Lead came is used around the perimeter of both ends for a more finished look and for a small degree of shock protection.

The following Slideshow documents the basic steps in its construction and below that I have embedded a four-clip short Videoshow of some basic techniques used.

Learning the making of an artwork can stimulate one’s appreciation for it and for this exciting and stimulating medium in general- that is my goal here – enjoy!

THE MAKING OF … SLIDESHOW:

THE MAKING OF … VIDEOSHOW: